Updates on my Book and How Facebook Screws us Over!

Facebook is only letting 10% or less of you see my posts made there now, unless you comment, share, or like stuff on my page regularly, in a way to make me pay for ad time. Well, since I am way too broke right now to pay for any ad time, I ask that you please comment, like or share this image or any others that you enjoy through the page. Let’s get this going again! I want to be able to share with everyone!

I haven’t been posting to my website in a moment, and I wanted to stop by and let everyone know I am still here, just very busy with everything so back and forth! Finally getting everything with my book completed!

As for my book, the 116 page hard cover version of my book “Empty Spaces” will be available starting this week for ordering! These will be priced at $80.00 and will be 11.25×8.75 in size. I will share a large section of the book through images here in just a little bit! A lot of hard work has been put into this book and it would be amazing to share with everyone, as well as it would be a very huge help to the continuation of further projects!

I’m beyond happy to have such a great group of awesome people who enjoy seeing my photos and writing. It’s such a trip, how I reach people from all over the world through my work, and that feeling is unmatched by much. I can’t wait to continue doing even greater things in the future, and continuing to share it with every single one of you!

Thank you everyone for being supportive and amazing!

There is something quite different about abandoned churches. The wide open space, such a loud, reverberating atmosphere from every step you take, and every time your mouth slips a word. To stand in an abandoned church at night, while the moonlight shines in…I would love to sit and play the piano for hours beneath the moonlight…some day.

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The Very Loud Silence of an Abandoned Mall

Dead malls and the interest in them across the country has seen a rise over the recent years. Pretty soon I feel that the need for shopping malls will become extinct, as it almost has already…I wonder where that will leave Great Lakes mall…

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The feeling of wandering the corridors of a large abandoned mall are unmatched by many things, including the exploration of almost anywhere else.

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Not many explorations can give you such a great feeling of tranquility as you stroll the space, which used to be occupied by hundreds or thousands of America’s consumers, angst-ridden teenagers, jocks and cheerleaders. The vastness now sits in darkness, with only the skylights illuminating the interior, while the silence grips open space and fills the air with a very real sound of emptiness.

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It’s not very often that you can actually say a complete silence has such a great volume.

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The Randall Park Mall was one of the world’s largest enclosed shopping malls, built by the Edward J. DeBartolo Corp. of Youngstown, a major developer of shopping centers.

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Randall Park Mall opened in 1976 and closed in 2009. In 1995, there were 120 stores that employed 5,000 people. The mall began its decline in the early 2000s when J.C. Penney and Dillard’s left. By 2008, the mall was basically empty. The mall is currently being demolished and will be gone any day now. An industrial park will replace it.

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As the country sinks into this large strip of decaying holes, which form the rust belt, all we do is sit back and watch as these buildings are stripped to their skeletons and eventually demolished, making space for either vacant lots or something else that may take the same fall.

You can view the entire article and other photos by clicking the link below!

Thank you to Matt Stopera at BuzzFeed for featuring my photos!

http://www.buzzfeed.com/mjs538/completely-surreal-pictures-of-americas-abandoned-malls

I Have Finally Finished My Book and it is Available online!

Happy to say that the e-book version of my book is available here for tons of different devices! I’ve even included a lending feature where once bought you will be able to lend it to friend for 14 days! Print versions coming soon, but for any of you that enjoy reading on mobile devices or the computer, here you go!

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00J7ALXU0

I hope to very soon start printing the physical copies for those who would like to purchase one! I’m pretty excited to get them made and be able to actually hold them in my hands. A lot of work has went into this, and I can’t wait to share it as much as possible!

Fire In Garrettsville

So, a little unexpected turn for the day as most of the historical strip of Garrettsville, OH has turned to ash. Send good, positive thoughts to those who lost shops, and hope that everyone came out okay and uninjured.

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An Alternate Perception

Images of blighted, broken industry, through the decay and destruction of nearly post-apocalyptic scenes have become a much greater intriguing subject for the people of our world in current time, it seems. Flashback to the 1960s, or even the 70s when life was a bit more free, lacking technology and the constant grinding chatter of an online social networking presence. The general outlook on our future world was a wondrous one, filled with smoothly operating hover cars, tall chrome and glass buildings, complete with an incredibly perfect networking community nearly free of depression, or half of the issues we are facing today.

Fast-forward 30+ years later, and here we are stuck in a madhouse.

The average outlook on our future world has become one of a gray, crumbling city skyline. Our industry has fallen, the community is very loosely knit, and we left behind many structures we once found wonderful. Prices are up, jobs are down, and sometimes it feels like you can’t do anything without having your life synced to a gmail account.

All of the technology we had dreamt of having in the 60s and 70s has finally come to creation in reality, but at the same time it has broken us down as a community, causing just as many problems as it has created innovations. With new technology constantly building, many of these places around us are being forgotten, tossed aside as trash and left to rot under the elements. Fields of trees and open areas full of nothing but nature are being dug up, torn up, torn down, ripped to dirt for brand new shops, car dealerships, etc. while the old ones are left behind.

Everywhere we go, we see people with their faces buried in a phone instead of a book, reading conspiracy theories instead of truly informative information.

Our entire perception of our future has been altered to a vast, dark, grey world of destruction. Our drive towards this brand new futuristic society has become skewed, and left us blinded, forgetting about what has left been left behind, including both nature and architecture. Now that we have the technology we once dreamt of, we see that it is doing as much damage as it is doing good. I believe this may be why people have become much more interested in these images of decay, because somewhere in everyone’s mind we know this is what our future has come to, and it is such a drastic change.

People have become interested in what the reality of our future has really become, some nearly baffled that this is what our world has come to, and even more so surprised when they learn that most of these structured depicted in images sit nearly in their own backyard.

With the destruction of so much nature, we are left with less to look at, while at the same time making the great places harder to find. I love to document these hidden areas, showcasing the gifts that our world can give to us naturally. It shares such beauty with us, yet we continue to tear it down until we have so little left. Through my photography, I document the destruction we have created, and everything we have left behind. When nature reclaims its place, we realize how truly small we are in this world, and it can create such a beautiful scene.

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http://www.architecturalafterlife.com/

http://www.facebook.com/UrbanExplorationUS

http://www.facebook.com/JohnnyJooPhotography

http://www.youtube.com/UrbexUS

Twitter – @Urbexus

Instagram – @5krapbrain

Soundcloud – http://www.soundcloud.com/5krapbrain117

Bandcamp - http://5krapbrain.bandcamp.com

Sounds of Urban Exploration

This video presents a small intro of a project that I hope to grow further with every day. I will be converting the rust and destruction through images of abandonment and decay, to sounds through a spectrograph.

I hope everyone can enjoy this short intro video.

Comment any thoughts below, and if this sounds interesting to you, please share!

#SoundsofUrbanExploring

http://www.architecturalafterlife.com/

http://www.facebook.com/UrbanExplorationUS

http://www.facebook.com/JohnnyJooPhotography

http://www.youtube.com/UrbexUS

Twitter – @Urbexus

Instagram – @5krapbrain

One of the Strangest Abandoned Places I Have Been

Probably one of the strangest places I have been.

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This bowling alley sits vacant, nearly in the middle of nowhere. Climbing through a small entrance in back, I entered into what looked to be a fully functional bowling alley, MAYBE still in use.

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Nope.

I came to find that I was creating slight foot prints in dust, and cobwebs had wrapped around the base of some chairs. However, pins still remain partly set, as if everyone left during the middle of a session of games. A small layer of dust covered the floors, chairs and bar. A bowling ball even remained in the ball return round about.

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The place had such an eerie feel. Some windows had been cracked, and ceiling tiles began to fall.

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Ashtrays remain sat at the bar, while the counter collects dust.

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No heat left the entire place frigid, cracking the wood.

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Shoes sit, tucked into cubbies, untouched and unworn. Who knows how long they may have sat here?

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It’s as if nobody has set foot, or bowling shoe in here for quite some time.

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http://www.architecturalafterlife.com/

http://www.facebook.com/UrbanExplorationUS

http://www.facebook.com/JohnnyJooPhotography

http://www.youtube.com/UrbexUS

Twitter – Urbexus

Instagram – @5krapbrain

Prismatic

Prismatic

A video I have been working on, on and off for some time now these past months. It is a project revisited and re-done, from something I had made previously.

Most all of it was filmed with my Samsung Galaxy S3, while just a couple of clips here and there were filmed with my GoPro Hero 3 and an old Vivitar camcorder from like…2008?

Anyway, here it is! I hope you enjoy it!

<iframe width=”640″ height=”360″ src=”//www.youtube.com/embed/1ZWSrCti7JA?list=UUlmWYgxqUlY71WGBRUh-OyQ” frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen></iframe>

Music – Ludovico Einaudi – Nuvole Bianche

Video/Edit – Johnny Joo

http://www.facebook.com/JohnnyJooPhotography

http://www.facebook.com/UrbanExplorationUS

http://www.architecturalafterlife.com/

Twitter:

@UrbexUS
@5krapbrain

Instagram:

@5krapbrain

 

 

If The World Were Taken Over by Cats

Sometimes, while driving home I have some ridiculous thoughts.

Recently that thought was just this:

“What if cats were to begin an apocalypse?”

I feel as though this may be what it would be like. No, I don’t think cats will have laser eyes, or anything like that…I just believe there MIGHT be some giant cats floating through space, piloting ships shaped like cats, and one day they may descend to Earth, and…well…

This is where it will leave us.

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Cleveland’s Falling Industry

December 23, 1814 marks the date that Cleveland would receive its charter as a village under the name of Cleaveland, named after U.S. General Moses Cleaveland.

By 1820, the village population had grown to 606 people, while Cuyahoga county in its entirety held 6,328.

Some years later, on January 6, 1831 The Cleveland Advertiser changed the name of the village, dropping the first “a” in order to fit the generals name upon the newspaper’s masthead. It was not long after this, that Cleveland would come to creation as its own official city in the year 1836.

By 1850, Cleveland saw a significant rise in population, bringing in numerous jobs, a strong workforce and wonderful living place to its 17,034 residents. As the city continued establishing larger businesses, such as Sherwin Williams in 1866, the rise of the steel industry in 1868, and the Standard Oil Company established by John D. Rockefeller in the year 1870, population grew with it reaching 92,829 and was noted as the 15th largest city in the nation.

The year 1890 rolled through, along with the first electric streetcar shortly before in 1888. Cleveland’s population was now 261,353 and ranked as 10th largest city in the nation.

During the early 1920’s the economy was booming with business in both the textile and steel industry. Stocks were high, dramatically increasing in value topping the 100-point mark in industrial stocks. Clevelanders, as well as many others in the U.S. began to buy in. By this time, in the 1920’s Cleveland was now ranked 5th largest with a population of 796,841. Life was good, and the city was booming, until the great stock market crash of 1929.

Among the cities vast collection of factories was Westinghouse Electric, founded by George Westinghouse, established in 1886 and finally reaching Cleveland in 1894 as a result of a patent-infringement lawsuit against the Cleveland-based Walker Mfg. Co. Westinghouse would come to have many notable engineers working for his company including William Stanley, Nikola Tesla, Vladimir Zworykin, Oliver B. Shallenberger, Benjamin Garver Lamme and his sister Bertha Lamme. The Westinghouse company rivaled General Electric, founded by George’s arch-rival, Thomas Edison.

Westinghouse pioneered long-distance power transmission and high-voltage alternating-current transmission, unveiling the technology for lighting in Great Barrington, Massachusetts.

Many years and many creations later, the Cleveland Westinghouse facilities began closing their doors during the post-World War II period. The corporation expanded its sales and service activities, operation branches of sales and engineering, elevator, and repair divisions, as well as sales offices. By the mid-1970s most all Cleveland manufacturing locations had been closed, and anything remaining was continued through the Rockside Road location into the 1980s.

During the 1980s, the Reagan-era defense build-up brought Westinghouse lucrative government contracts as remaining factories geared toward the production of torpedoes. By 1993 this was brought to a halt, when defense cuts began affecting the company, and they were forced to lay off 150 workers from the Cleveland division. In 1994 the Eaton Corp. bought Westinghouse for $1.6 billion, who then began converting the research and development facilities, as well as the manufacturing plant, into commercially oriented enterprises.

Another notable location displaying part of Cleveland’s fallen industry is the Joseph & Feiss Cloth craft building on Cleveland’s west side. This company was a very important piece to Cleveland’s garment industry, coming from Meadville, PA in 1845 originally as Koch & Loeb, setting up a wholesale clothing store at 82 Superior St. This firm, which was run by Kaufman Koch, provided a general like of men’s and boys clothing as well as piece goods to tailors. After changing partners several times, the Koch & Loeb name would transition to the Joseph & Feiss Co. in 1907. During the 1920s, Moritz Joseph and Julius Feiss opened a new factory location, under the brand name “Clothcraft,” heavily advertising their $15 blue serge suit serving as the “Model T” of the clothing industry, providing steady business for the company until 1925.

In 1966, Joseph & Feiss merged with Phillips-Van Heusen Corp. but remained under the same original name through operations in Cleveland, where the production and sales of tailored men’s apparel continued, only under the Cricketeer and Country Britches label. Women’s clothes were added to the line in 1980, and shortly after in 1989 Hugo Boss AG, a West German clothing and accessory firm acquired Joseph & Feiss.

By 1995 the company employed 800 people in the Cleveland area. The following year, production of the Cricketeer and Country Britches label was put to an end due to a growing acceptance of casual clothing among Americans, as well as harsh competition from lower-priced imports; this lead to the lay off of over 200 workers. In 1997, Joseph & Feiss, along with nearly 450 employees moved any remaining manufacturing operations to a distribution center on Tiedman Road in Brooklyn. The company still continues production of suits, sport coats, and slacks for the Hugo Boss brand. The previous factory remains vacant and scarred by decay as it crumbles towards the ground, undergoing constant bombardment from scrappers, snow and rain.

The insides of this factory are covered with some beautiful work from various graffiti artists throughout the Cleveland area, and even some from out of state.